The Rose Parade® Through the Lens of a Broadcaster

While more than 700,000 spectators line the streets of Pasadena to experience the Rose Parade in person, more than 81 million people around the world enjoy the parade within the comfort of their homes. From the months that precede the parade through the morning of New Year’s Day, producers from various networks work tirelessly to gather information, draft scripts and prepare on-air talent to create a unique Rose Parade experience for their viewers.

What does it take to broadcast the Rose Parade? The Tournament of Roses® asked Joe Quasarano, executive producer of KTLA’s Rose Parade broadcast, for a behind-the-scenes peek at the Rose Parade through the lens of a broadcast team.

For more than 20 years, Quasarano has played a key role in producing KTLA’s Rose Parade coverage.

For more than 20 years, Quasarano has played a key role in producing KTLA’s Rose Parade coverage.

“Preparation for the KTLA Rose Parade broadcast begins for us right after Labor Day,” said Quasarano. “During this time, we secure video trucks and start to see the floats in their various stages of construction.”

Several months before the parade, Quasarano prepares homework for KTLA hosts Bob Eubanks and Stephanie Edwards regarding parade entries while writers work on the script – a process that spans September to late December – gathering and editing detailed facts about each entry.

In addition to preparations for the domestic KTLA broadcast, Quasarano also works with third parties regarding timing in other parts of the world and delays for the international broadcast.

TV Corner_Aerial 33262_208

While the parade route is 5½ miles long, broadcasters are positioned along the corner of Orange Grove and Colorado Boulevard, an area that over the years has been nicknamed “TV Corner.”

“The day after Christmas, Bob and Stephanie visit the floats in person and are given their scripts to review so that they can learn facts about each entry,” said Quasarano. Once Christmas passes, it’s crunch time.

In the days leading up to the parade, while thousands of volunteers flock to the float barns to decorate the parade’s floral masterpieces, broadcasters are busy adding last minute information to their scripts.

On December 28, set up – a process that involves approximately 130 technicians – begins and is followed by rehearsal on New Year’s Eve. The morning of the parade, the crew arrives at 2 a.m. to set up while the news crew conducts KTLA’s pre-parade coverage at 6 a.m.

A New Year’s Day tradition, the Rose Parade brings joy to millions of people around the world through a variety of broadcasts available to almost every continent and in multiple languages. Can’t make it to Pasadena this year to witness the parade in person? Check out our list of broadcasters to find a station near you!

facebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather

Horse Power – High-stepping Down Colorado Boulevard

Since the first Rose Parade® in 1890, horses have played a special role in America’s New Year Celebration®. From pulling flower-covered carriages to providing “horse power” for the first floats, the role of equestrian units has evolved over time. Despite the advent of motorized vehicles and technology, today’s highly trained equestrian units remain an integral component of the Rose Parade line-up.

Carefully selected each year, equestrian units highlight a variety of horse breeds, skilled riders (sporting eye-catching costumes) and hand-crafted tack to add to the entertainment value of the Rose Parade and the annual Equestfest. While traditional equestrian units in the Tournament of Roses® history were comprised primarily of horses, the 2015 Rose Parade equestrian roster included a unique entry made up entirely of mules!

The United States Forest Service celebrates wilderness management mules as an equestrian unit in the 2015 Rose Parade presented by Honda on January 1, 2015.

The United States Forest Service celebrates wilderness management mules as an equestrian unit in the 2015 Rose Parade presented by Honda on January 1, 2015.

The United States Forest Service equestrian unit featured 23 Sorrel mules with three pack strings. These pack strings represented the Forest Service history, the important role that pack stock play in supporting wildland firefighters and the 50th anniversary of the National Wilderness Preservation System.

From 1905-1950, the Forest Service used mules for wilderness management and trail construction before being replaced by technology. On January 1st this year, the United States Forest Service equestrian unit celebrated the return of its mules to wilderness management. The mules that appeared in the 2015 Rose Parade were all working mules who returned to work in the wilderness following their trek down Colorado Boulevard.

What equestrian units will you see in the 2016 Rose Parade? The deadline for equestrian units to apply is May 31, 2015. For more information, please visit our website.

facebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather

The Adventures of a Rose Queen®

While many activities for Rose Queen Madison and the 2015 Royal Court centered on the build-up to New Year’s Day, their reign continues long after the float ride down Colorado Boulevard. In addition to representing the Tournament of Roses® at a handful of public events within the greater Pasadena area, Queen Madison – along with Tournament officials – have been busy traveling to various festivals throughout the United States.

From Georgia’s Macon Cherry Blossom Festival to Texas’s Fiesta San Antonio Festival, Queen Madison has taken on the title of “Visiting Royalty,” enjoying various elements of each festival – including riding in their parades.

In between festival events, sightseeing and guided tours, Queen Madison dined in some of San Antonio’s local restaurants with other “Visiting Royalty” in her most recent trip to the Fiesta San Antonio Festival.

In between festival events, sightseeing and guided tours, Queen Madison dined in some of San Antonio’s local restaurants with other “Visiting Royalty” in her most recent trip to the Fiesta San Antonio Festival.

Aside from the thrill of adventure – why do the Rose Queen and Tournament officials travel to other festivals?

Simple. The Tournament of Roses shares a reciprocal relationship with 10 national and international festivals. Through these relationships, Tournament officials are invited to attend festivals and parades, and do so with the focus of looking for ways to continually improve America’s New Year Celebration®.

Where will Queen Madison and the Tournament of Roses travel next? Stay tuned to find out!

facebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather

“Find Your Adventure” in 2016

Building upon a year of inspiring stories, 2016 Tournament of Roses® President Mike Matthiessen encourages communities across the country to take action through the 127th Rose Parade® theme, “Find Your Adventure.”

Adventures can range in size and splendor. Through them we learn about ourselves, others and our surrounding environment – but first we have to find them.

Leading by example, the Tournament of Roses has embarked on an adventure of its own by collaborating with the National Park Service for the 2016 Rose Parade.

“As proponents of the American spirit, we encourage people to find beauty in the landscape that builds the backdrop of their lives,” said Matthiessen.

The 2016 Rose Parade poster highlights America’s New Year Celebration and our nation’s national parks.

The 2016 Rose Parade poster highlights America’s New Year Celebration and our nation’s national parks.

Both the Tournament of Roses and the National Park Service aim to preserve history, connect people through real-life experiences and engage the public in new adventures. Through this unique alliance, the 2016 Rose Parade will shine light on the centennial celebration of our nation’s national parks.

“Our hope for the New Year is that however you define it, you will find your adventure and enrich your life,” said Matthiessen.

 

facebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather

Royal Court Fashion

For 96 years, members of the Tournament of Roses® Royal Court have served as ambassadors to the Association and City of Pasadena. Balancing school, work and extracurricular activities, seven young women are selected each year to represent and serve the community – in style.

While today’s Royal Court receives a wardrobe courtesy of Macy’s and gowns from Tadashi Shoji, the first Rose Queen® and early Royal Court members sewed their own dresses, crafted headdresses and even assisted in building their float!

Reflecting their respective eras through the fashion of their times, Royal Courts have left lasting impressions on millions throughout the Pasadena area. Take a walk through history with these photos showcasing each Royal Court’s unique style.

 

1905 Rose Queen Hallie Woods

1905 Rose Queen Hallie Woods

 

Hallie Woods, the first Rose Queen in 1905, reflected the haute couture movement that was prevalent at the turn of the century. This movement featured an abundance of lace, tight collars and upswept hair.

 

1929 Rose Queen and Royal Court

1929 Royal Court

 

In the 20s, an era marked by the drop-waist “flapper” dress, sheer stockings and bobbed hair, the Royal Court was right in step with the fashions of the time.

 

1951 Rose Queen and Royal Court

1951 Royal Court

 

Wartime courts sported sleek, pared-back styles, while the 1950s brought prim and proper dresses, with tiny waists, lavish skirts and pin-curled hair.

 

1972 Royal Court

1972 Royal Court

 

The 70s brought mod-squad inspired fashions featuring bright colors and playful prints.

 

1989 Royal Court

1989 Royal Court

 

The 80s were filled with big shoulders and equally big hair (no open flames, please!). This was the decade of both the first Asian-American Rose Queen, Leslie Kawai in 1981, and the first African-American Rose Queen, Kristina Smith in 1985.

 

1993 Royal Court

1993 Royal Court

 

After years of form fitting gowns, the 90s styles were more relaxed with a minimal fit and professional style.

 

Regardless of the fashion trends of the era, Royal Court members continue to outshine their wardrobe with poise, personality and confidence making them outstanding representatives of the Tournament of Roses and exceptional role models.

 

facebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather

Share Your Inspiring Stories, Win a trip to America’s New Year Celebration

 

38nkv8lmokmy9f7cses4nqfc6yfil9-medium

With less than three months to go, the 126th Rose Parade on January 1, 2015 promises to be an inspiring and unforgettable celebration and we want to hear from you!

The theme of the 2015 parade, “Inspiring Stories,” encourages us to reflect on and appreciate the many people around us who elevate the human spirit.  The 2015 parade Grand Marshal, Louis Zamperini, was the embodiment of an inspiring story.

His story will continue to be shared on New Year’s Day and your own personal inspiring stories will be showcased through our new #RoseParade #Inspiring Stories social media campaign. We encourage you to submit an inspiring photo, story or video through Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. With each entry, you become eligible to win a trip for two to the 2015 Rose Parade presented by Honda and the College Football Playoff Semifinal at the Rose Bowl Game presented by Northwestern Mutual. Simply share your stories with the hashtags, #RoseParade and #Inspiring. Upon your submission, you will be able to view them here.

What inspires you? We can’t wait to hear your stories.

facebooktwitterpinterestmailby feather